When Water Outpaces Silicon…

On target: Water is fanned out through a specially developed nozzle, and then a laser pulse is passed through it to create a switch. (Courtesy: Adrian Buchmann) Topics: Applied Physics, Lasers, Materials Science, Photonics, Semiconductor Technology A laser-controlled water-based switch that operates twice as fast as existing semiconductor switches has been developed by a trio ofContinue reading “When Water Outpaces Silicon…”

Chip Act and Wave Surfing…

Massive subsidies to regain the edge of the US semiconductor industry will not likely succeed unless progress is made in winning the global race of idea flow and monetization. Topics: Applied Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Semiconductor Technology Intelligent use of subsidies for winning the global idea race is a must for gaining andContinue reading “Chip Act and Wave Surfing…”

CEM for SEI…

Panel A shows how the native SEI on Li metal is passivating to nitrogen gas, which means that no reactivity with Li metal is possible. Panel B shows that a proton donor like Ethanol will disrupt the SEI passivation and enable Li metal to react with nitrogen species. Panel C describes 3 potential mechanisms throughContinue reading “CEM for SEI…”

Caveat Emptor…

Topics: Alternate Energy, Applied Physics, Climate Change, Energy, Global Warming, Lasers, Nuclear Fusion After the heady, breathtaking coverage of pop science journalism, I dove into the grim world inhabited by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on their take on the first-ever fusion reaction. I can say that I wasn’t surprised. With all this publicity,Continue reading “Caveat Emptor…”

OPVs…

V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE Topics: Alternate Energy, Applied Physics, Chemistry, Materials Science, Solar Power As ultrathin organic solar cells hit new efficiency records, researchers see green energy potential in surprising places. In November 2021, while the municipal utility in Marburg, Germany, was performing scheduled maintenance on a hot water storage facility, engineers glued 18 solar panels toContinue reading “OPVs…”

Mirror, Mirror…

Topics: Applied Physics, Atomic-Scale Microscopy, Materials Science, Optics (Nanowerk News) When it goes online, the MAGIS-100 experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and its successors will explore the nature of gravitational waves and search for certain kinds of wavelike dark matter. But first, researchers need to figure out something pretty basic: how to get good photographsContinue reading “Mirror, Mirror…”

ARDP…

Topics: Applied Physics, Alternate Energy, Climate Change, Nuclear Power According to the US Energy Information Administration, the US uses a mixture of 60.8% fossil fuel sources to generate 2,504 billion kilowatt hours of energy. Our nuclear expenditure is a paltry 18.9%. The totality of renewable sources (wind, hydropower, solar, biomass, and geothermal) is a littleContinue reading “ARDP…”

DUNE Detector…

Topics: Applied Physics, Modern Physics, Particle Physics, Theoretical Physics The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be the world’s largest cryogenic particle detector. Its aim is to study the most elusive of particles: neutrinos. Teams from around the world are developing and constructing detector components that they will ship to the Sanford Underground Research Facility,Continue reading “DUNE Detector…”

Perovskite and Maxima…

Topics: Alternate Energy, Applied Physics, Battery, Chemistry, Civilization, Climate Change A longstanding explanation for why perovskite materials make such good solar cells has been cast into doubt thanks to new measurements. Previously, physicists ascribed the favorable optoelectronic properties of lead halide perovskites to the behavior of quasiparticles called polarons within the material’s crystal lattice. Now,Continue reading “Perovskite and Maxima…”

Getting Back Mojo…

Topics: Applied Physics, Lasers, Magnetism, Materials Science, Phonons When a magnetic material is bombarded with short pulses of laser light, it loses its magnetism within femtoseconds (10–15 seconds). The spin, or angular momentum, of the electrons in the material, thus disappears almost instantly. Yet all that angular momentum cannot simply be lost. It must be conservedContinue reading “Getting Back Mojo…”