Mirror, Mirror…

Topics: Applied Physics, Atomic-Scale Microscopy, Materials Science, Optics (Nanowerk News) When it goes online, the MAGIS-100 experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and its successors will explore the nature of gravitational waves and search for certain kinds of wavelike dark matter. But first, researchers need to figure out something pretty basic: how to get good photographsContinue reading “Mirror, Mirror…”

ARDP…

Topics: Applied Physics, Alternate Energy, Climate Change, Nuclear Power According to the US Energy Information Administration, the US uses a mixture of 60.8% fossil fuel sources to generate 2,504 billion kilowatt hours of energy. Our nuclear expenditure is a paltry 18.9%. The totality of renewable sources (wind, hydropower, solar, biomass, and geothermal) is a littleContinue reading “ARDP…”

DUNE Detector…

Topics: Applied Physics, Modern Physics, Particle Physics, Theoretical Physics The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be the world’s largest cryogenic particle detector. Its aim is to study the most elusive of particles: neutrinos. Teams from around the world are developing and constructing detector components that they will ship to the Sanford Underground Research Facility,Continue reading “DUNE Detector…”

Perovskite and Maxima…

Topics: Alternate Energy, Applied Physics, Battery, Chemistry, Civilization, Climate Change A longstanding explanation for why perovskite materials make such good solar cells has been cast into doubt thanks to new measurements. Previously, physicists ascribed the favorable optoelectronic properties of lead halide perovskites to the behavior of quasiparticles called polarons within the material’s crystal lattice. Now,Continue reading “Perovskite and Maxima…”

Getting Back Mojo…

Topics: Applied Physics, Lasers, Magnetism, Materials Science, Phonons When a magnetic material is bombarded with short pulses of laser light, it loses its magnetism within femtoseconds (10–15 seconds). The spin, or angular momentum, of the electrons in the material, thus disappears almost instantly. Yet all that angular momentum cannot simply be lost. It must be conservedContinue reading “Getting Back Mojo…”

Strain and Flow…

Topics: Applied Physics, Condensed Matter Physics, Electrical Engineering Using a technique known as strain engineering, researchers in the US and Germany have constructed an “excitonic wire” – a one-dimensional channel through which electron-hole pairs (excitons) can flow in a two-dimensional semiconductor like water through a pipe. The work could aid the development of a newContinue reading “Strain and Flow…”

Martian Windmills…

Topics: Applied Physics, Energy, Mars, Space Exploration (Inside Science) — Mars is known for its dust storms, which can cause problems for lander equipment and block out the sun that fuels solar panels. These punishing storms, which can last for weeks, have already caused damage to equipment and even killed NASA’s Opportunity rover. But they couldContinue reading “Martian Windmills…”

Time…

Topics: Applied Physics, Education, Research, Thermodynamics Also note the Hyper Physics link on the Second Law of Thermodynamics, particularly “Time’s Arrow.” “The two most powerful warriors are patience and time,” Leo Tolstoy, War, and Peace The short answerWe can measure time intervals — the duration between two events — most accurately with atomic clocks. TheseContinue reading “Time…”

HETs…

Topics: Applied Physics, Computer Modeling, NASA, Space Exploration, Spaceflight Abstract Hall effect thrusters operating at power levels in excess of several hundreds of kilowatts have been identified as enabling technologies for applications such as lunar tugs, large satellite orbital transfer vehicles, and solar system exploration. These large thrusters introduce significant testing challenges due to theContinue reading “HETs…”

Wearable Pressure Sensors…

Topics: Applied Physics, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology Wearable pressure sensors are commonly used in medicine to track vital signs, and in robotics to help mechanical fingers handle delicate objects. Conventional soft capacitive pressure sensors only work at pressures below 3 kPa, however, meaning that something as simple as tight-fitting clothing can hinder their performance. A team ofContinue reading “Wearable Pressure Sensors…”