Strain and Flow…

Topics: Applied Physics, Condensed Matter Physics, Electrical Engineering Using a technique known as strain engineering, researchers in the US and Germany have constructed an “excitonic wire” – a one-dimensional channel through which electron-hole pairs (excitons) can flow in a two-dimensional semiconductor like water through a pipe. The work could aid the development of a newContinue reading “Strain and Flow…”

Martian Windmills…

Topics: Applied Physics, Energy, Mars, Space Exploration (Inside Science) — Mars is known for its dust storms, which can cause problems for lander equipment and block out the sun that fuels solar panels. These punishing storms, which can last for weeks, have already caused damage to equipment and even killed NASA’s Opportunity rover. But they couldContinue reading “Martian Windmills…”

Time…

Topics: Applied Physics, Education, Research, Thermodynamics Also note the Hyper Physics link on the Second Law of Thermodynamics, particularly “Time’s Arrow.” “The two most powerful warriors are patience and time,” Leo Tolstoy, War, and Peace The short answerWe can measure time intervals — the duration between two events — most accurately with atomic clocks. TheseContinue reading “Time…”

HETs…

Topics: Applied Physics, Computer Modeling, NASA, Space Exploration, Spaceflight Abstract Hall effect thrusters operating at power levels in excess of several hundreds of kilowatts have been identified as enabling technologies for applications such as lunar tugs, large satellite orbital transfer vehicles, and solar system exploration. These large thrusters introduce significant testing challenges due to theContinue reading “HETs…”

Wearable Pressure Sensors…

Topics: Applied Physics, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology Wearable pressure sensors are commonly used in medicine to track vital signs, and in robotics to help mechanical fingers handle delicate objects. Conventional soft capacitive pressure sensors only work at pressures below 3 kPa, however, meaning that something as simple as tight-fitting clothing can hinder their performance. A team ofContinue reading “Wearable Pressure Sensors…”

E=mc^2…

Topics: Applied Physics, Einstein, General Relativity, Special Relativity According to Einstein’s theory of special relativity, first published in 1905, light can be converted into matter when two light particles collide with intense force. But, try as they might, scientists have never been able to do this. No one could create the conditions needed to transformContinue reading “E=mc^2…”

Exciton Surfing…

Topics: Alternate Energy, Applied Physics, Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Solar Power Organic solar cells (OSCs) are fascinating devices where layers of organic molecules or polymers carry out light absorption and subsequent transport of energy – the tasks that make a solar cell work. Until now, the efficiency of OSCs has been thought to be constrained byContinue reading “Exciton Surfing…”

Cold Atmospheric Plasmas…

Topics: Applied Physics, Chemistry, Physics, Plasma, Research ABSTRACT Cold atmospheric plasmas have great application potential due to their production of diverse types of reactive species, so understanding the production mechanism and then improving the production efficiency of the key reactive species are very important. However, plasma chemistry typically comprises a complex network of chemical speciesContinue reading “Cold Atmospheric Plasmas…”

Dielectric Laser Accelerators…

Topics: Applied Physics, Modern Physics, Particle Physics Physics Today 74, 8, 42 (2021); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.4815 Particle accelerators are among the most important scientific tools of the modern age. Major accelerator facilities, such as the 27-km-circumference Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, where the Higgs boson was recently discovered, allow scientists to uncover fundamental properties of matter and energy. ButContinue reading “Dielectric Laser Accelerators…”

Stop-Motion Efficiency…

Topics: Applied Physics, Electrical Engineering, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Technology A new ultrafast imaging technique that captures the motion of atoms in nanoscale electronic devices has revealed the existence of a short-lived electronic state that could make it possible to develop faster and more energy-efficient computers. The imaging technique, which involves switching the devices on and offContinue reading “Stop-Motion Efficiency…”