Cooling Computer Chips…

Topics: Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Technology A novel semiconducting material with high thermal conductivity can be integrated into high-power computer chips to cool them down and so improve their performance. The material, boron arsenide, is better at removing heat than the best thermal-management devices available today, according to the US-based researchers who developed it. TheContinue reading “Cooling Computer Chips…”

Stop-Motion Efficiency…

Topics: Applied Physics, Electrical Engineering, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Technology A new ultrafast imaging technique that captures the motion of atoms in nanoscale electronic devices has revealed the existence of a short-lived electronic state that could make it possible to develop faster and more energy-efficient computers. The imaging technique, which involves switching the devices on and offContinue reading “Stop-Motion Efficiency…”

Integrated Nanodiamonds…

Topics: Nanotechnology, Quantum Computer, Quantum Mechanics, Semiconductor Technology (Nanowerk News) Physicists at Münster University have succeeded in fully integrating nanodiamonds into nanophotonic circuits and at the same time addressing several of these nanodiamonds optically. The study creates the basis for future applications in the field of quantum sensing schemes or quantum information processors. The resultsContinue reading “Integrated Nanodiamonds…”

Diamond Nanoneedles…

Topics: Materials Science, Modern Physics, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Technology If you ever manage to deform a diamond, you’re likely to break it. That’s because the hardest natural material on Earth is also inelastic and brittle. Two years ago, Ming Dao (MIT), Subra Suresh (Nanyang Technological University in Singapore), and their collaborators demonstrated that when bulk diamonds are etched into fine,Continue reading “Diamond Nanoneedles…”

Graphene Currents…

Topics: Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Quantum Mechanics, Semiconductor Technology A team led by researchers from Harvard University and the University of Maryland in the US has used defects in diamond to map the magnetic field generated by electrical currents in graphene. Their experiments reveal that currents in this atomically-thin form of carbon flow like a viscousContinue reading “Graphene Currents…”