Exciton Surfing…

Topics: Alternate Energy, Applied Physics, Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Solar Power Organic solar cells (OSCs) are fascinating devices where layers of organic molecules or polymers carry out light absorption and subsequent transport of energy – the tasks that make a solar cell work. Until now, the efficiency of OSCs has been thought to be constrained byContinue reading “Exciton Surfing…”

Biggie’s Starship…

Topics: Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Space Exploration, Spaceflight, Star Trek China is investigating how to build ultra-large spacecraft that are up to 0.6 mile (1 kilometer) long. But how feasible is the idea, and what would be the use of such a massive spacecraft? The project is part of a wider call for research proposals fromContinue reading “Biggie’s Starship…”

Cooling Computer Chips…

Topics: Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Technology A novel semiconducting material with high thermal conductivity can be integrated into high-power computer chips to cool them down and so improve their performance. The material, boron arsenide, is better at removing heat than the best thermal-management devices available today, according to the US-based researchers who developed it. TheContinue reading “Cooling Computer Chips…”

Stop-Motion Efficiency…

Topics: Applied Physics, Electrical Engineering, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Technology A new ultrafast imaging technique that captures the motion of atoms in nanoscale electronic devices has revealed the existence of a short-lived electronic state that could make it possible to develop faster and more energy-efficient computers. The imaging technique, which involves switching the devices on and offContinue reading “Stop-Motion Efficiency…”

Gold Anniversary…

Topics: Electrical Engineering, Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Solid-State Physics It’s not exactly a wedding anniversary, but it is significant. Fifty years ago this month, Intel introduced the first commercial microprocessor, the 4004. Microprocessors are tiny, general-purpose chips that use integrated circuits made up of transistors to process data; they are the core of a modern computer.Continue reading “Gold Anniversary…”

Nano Laser…

Topics: Applied Physics, Bose-Einstein Condensate, Lasers, Nanotechnology, Optics Physicists have taken a step towards realizing the smallest-ever solid-state laser by generating an exotic quantum state known as a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in quasiparticles consisting of both matter and light. Although the effect has so far only been observed at ultracold temperatures in atomically thin crystalsContinue reading “Nano Laser…”

Graphene Beam Splitter…

Topics: Graphene, Interferometry, Nanotechnology, Quantum Computer A graphene-based “beam splitter” for electronic currents has been built by researchers in France, South Korea, and Japan. Created by Preden Roulleau at the University of Paris and colleagues, the tunable device’s operation is directly comparable that of an optical interferometer. The technology could soon enable allow electron interferometry to beContinue reading “Graphene Beam Splitter…”

Colloidal Quantum Dots…

Topics: Energy, Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Quantum Mechanics, Solar Power ABSTRACTSolution-processed colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells are lightweight, flexible, inexpensive, and can be spray-coated on various substrates. However, their power conversion efficiency is still insufficient for commercial applications. To further boost CQD solar cell efficiency, researchers need to better understand and control how charge carriersContinue reading “Colloidal Quantum Dots…”

Kondo Mimic…

Topics: Magnetism, Materials Science, Nanotechnology A new type of quasiparticle – dubbed the “spinaron” by the scientists who discovered it – could be responsible for a magnetic phenomenon that is usually attributed to the Kondo effect. The research, which was carried out by Samir Lounis and colleagues at Germany’s Forschungszentrum Jülich, casts doubt on current theories of theContinue reading “Kondo Mimic…”

Nanoscale Knudsen Flow…

Topics: Fluid Mechanics, Materials Science, Nanofluidics, Nanotechnology Gases flow through a porous membrane at ultrahigh speeds even when the pores’ diameter approaches the atomic scale. This finding by researchers at the University of Manchester in the UK and the University of Pennsylvania in the US shows that the century-old Knudsen description of gas flow remainsContinue reading “Nanoscale Knudsen Flow…”